common / Luxe Living

Collecting evidence

A Hidden Harbor renovation showcases Native American art
BY MICHAEL KORB
Florida Weekly Correspondent

Above: In the breakfast nook, a treasured Navajo blanket dominates a wall and a custom-designed light fixture gives off a deliberate teepee vibe.Above: In the breakfast nook, a treasured Navajo blanket dominates a wall and a custom-designed light fixture gives off a deliberate teepee vibe.
Not everything in Naples was originally faux Italian. Some homes were a passable sense of ’90s generic that almost defied categorization. Witness this Bonita Bay Hidden Harbor gem, which just needed to be polished to find its charm.

The four-bedroom, 3½-bath, 3,500- -square-foot (under air) home was built in 1994. The current owners purchased it in 2008. Hailing from Arizona, the couple has a significant collection of Native American art they wanted to showcase in a manor befitting its origins.

So they hired interior designer Amy Coslet from Collins & DuPont to reimagine the space with the art in mind.

“The goal was to design the whole space to highlight their beautiful art collection,” says Ms. Coslet. “That was the inspiration. … They showed me all of the artifacts and told me the more important pieces they wanted displayed. And we customized display areas specific for certain pieces.”


Below: Souix beaded hide tobacco and dance bags (c. 1890) featuring dyed porcupine quills and glass beads are the perfect complement to the dining room. Below: Souix beaded hide tobacco and dance bags (c. 1890) featuring dyed porcupine quills and glass beads are the perfect complement to the dining room. Their collection — which spans everything from pottery to basketry to weaponry, tapestries and beaded clothing — is worthy of a whole-house remodel.

“One of the biggest things they collect is woven Navajo blankets, which we hung and highlighted as artwork,” adds Ms. Coslet. The blankets also set the tone for much of the coloring used throughout the home.

“The color palette and also the patterns are very bold and graphic,” the designer says. “We incorporated that in some of the fabrics we used. There are a lot of earthy tones and some terra cottas, and some of the basketry has bright, primary colors, so it was important to do a more neutral background.”


Above: The kitchen once screamed the ’90s from every angle. Removing part of a wall and replacing everything within reach turned it into a sleek, modern space that flows seamlessly into the main living area. Above: The kitchen once screamed the ’90s from every angle. Removing part of a wall and replacing everything within reach turned it into a sleek, modern space that flows seamlessly into the main living area. Ms. Coslet and her team lightened all the walls and focused on clean lines with the furnishings, adding pillows and accessories to compliment the color palette. The strategy lets the artwork stand on its own.

Conveniently, there weren’t a lot of structural changes that needed to be done on this makeover. The home already was an open-concept design with good bones, so the only major change was shortening a wall in the kitchen and raising a few ceilings to gain some extra height. That left designers free to focus on things such as custom built-ins and a linear fireplace set in a stacked-stone wall in the living room.

Ms. Coslet also designed all of the light fixtures, which are forged metal that blend rustic with modern. Some have leather strapping, others incorporate burlap. But the most entertaining is over the breakfast nook — and was inspired by a teepee.

The adjoining kitchen was completely gutted and made to be very clean and linear, again melding the subtle tones of the artwork, without competing for attention.

Now the home is the perfect case in which to cherish the treasures gained over a lifetime of collecting. ¦

— Collins & DuPont 8911 Brighton Lane, Bonita Springs 948- 2400; www.collins-dupont.com

— Harwick Homes 3368 Woods Edge Circle Bonita Springs 498- 0801; www.harwickhomes.com



Below: The master suite echoes the warm, earthy palette throughout the rest of the house. Below: The master suite echoes the warm, earthy palette throughout the rest of the house.

Because the house has good bones, interior designer Amy Coslet of Collins & DuPont was able to put much of her attention on paint, furnishings and accessories. New lighted towers in the living room display native pottery and accents, bookending a new linear fireplace and stacked-stone wall. A raw-cut piece of ash is used as a coffee table. Because the house has good bones, interior designer Amy Coslet of Collins & DuPont was able to put much of her attention on paint, furnishings and accessories. New lighted towers in the living room display native pottery and accents, bookending a new linear fireplace and stacked-stone wall. A raw-cut piece of ash is used as a coffee table.

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