common / Luxe Living

LISA FICARRA

… brings a global background to her Naples projects


This contemporary space combines living and dining areas under a unifying ceiling of floating beams. Rich dark mahogany woods create a sharp contrast to the muted grays and taupes of the fabrics. This contemporary space combines living and dining areas under a unifying ceiling of floating beams. Rich dark mahogany woods create a sharp contrast to the muted grays and taupes of the fabrics. There’s an elegant simplicity to the work of interior designer Lisa Ficarra of Ficarra Design Associates in Naples. She’s noted for timeless style and effortless attention to detail. Luxe Living’s Michael Korb caught up with her to ask about her muses, her process and how she got started.

Q: Is there one moment you can look back on that was pivotal to you wanting to be in this field?

A: My dad was a builder and took me to job sites with him when I was a child. I loved watching a building grow into someone’s home. When I was freshman in college in the art program, I decided I wanted to pursue architecture. But my school didn’t have an architecture program, so I joined the interior design program and took as many building and construction courses as I could. I pursued a position with an architect in New York doing interior design and realized that I could be more creative in interior design than architecture.


Lisa Ficarra Lisa Ficarra Q; Where did you get your training, and how has that shaped the work you do now?

A: I received my bachelor’s of science in interior design from Western Michigan University. I also studied in Italy my sophomore year and went back to work with an architect in Rome after I graduated. I took postgraduate courses at Parsons School of Design while working with an architect in New York designing airline facilities. Then, while in Boston designing interiors for software companies, I attended continuing education classes at the Boston Architectural College and Harvard.


Above: Fabrics in subtle ocean blues and greens, sand-colored walls and natural textures create a relaxing, spa-like atmosphere in this coastal living area. Above: Fabrics in subtle ocean blues and greens, sand-colored walls and natural textures create a relaxing, spa-like atmosphere in this coastal living area. My university education gave me my basic background in interior design, while my European travel and work experience with architects in Rome and New York gave me a perspective from the architect’s point of view. Now I incorporate my knowledge of architectural detailing into all of my interiors, whether contemporary or traditional.

Q: How do you find inspiration for a project?

A: My inspiration basically comes from my clients. We have our initial interview and I discover what type of feeling they’re considering for their new home and focus on their lifestyle. From there my inspiration might come from a few distinctive fabrics, patterns or colors we choose. I love using textures and different natural materials and mixing styles to create a unique look for each client.

Above: Faux snakeskin walls are just one of the imaginative elements incorporated into this sleek powder room. The countertop of Calcutta marble floats above a high-gloss taupe lacquer cabinet. LED under-lighting accents the striking geometric design of the marble floor./BRANTLEY PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY PHOTO Above: Faux snakeskin walls are just one of the imaginative elements incorporated into this sleek powder room. The countertop of Calcutta marble floats above a high-gloss taupe lacquer cabinet. LED under-lighting accents the striking geometric design of the marble floor.
/BRANTLEY PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY PHOTO
Q: How has the Naples market taste changed since you moved here?

A: When I moved from Europe to Naples in 1995, the style here at the time was very traditional and very Tuscan. There were a lot of arches, columns and faux finishes in many houses. Today my Naples clients want simple, clean classic lines. We have more clients who are willing to cross into contemporary style. Naples has a wonderful group of talented designers who really strive to create tasteful and unique interiors.

Q: Is there a trend you are excited to see go away?


Above: A floating light shelf on the ceiling of this casual yet functional study adds architectural interest. The wall cabinet encompasses one side of the room and has cross grain wood panels that conceal the television and office equipment. 
BRANTLEY PHOTOGRAPHY / COURTESY PHOTO Above: A floating light shelf on the ceiling of this casual yet functional study adds architectural interest. The wall cabinet encompasses one side of the room and has cross grain wood panels that conceal the television and office equipment. BRANTLEY PHOTOGRAPHY / COURTESY PHOTO A: I am so glad the “Tuscan Era” is gone, and I know a lot of my colleagues feel the same way. ¦

— Ficarra Design Associates 633 Tamiami Trail N, Suite 200 643- 3450 www.ficarradesignassociates.com



Left: A custom, silver/gray metallic finish and plastered texture give the walls of this powder room a dramatic, three-dimensional feel. The quartz countertop was designed to give the illusion that it’s floating, and LED lighting accents the backdrop. Left: A custom, silver/gray metallic finish and plastered texture give the walls of this powder room a dramatic, three-dimensional feel. The quartz countertop was designed to give the illusion that it’s floating, and LED lighting accents the backdrop.

Return to top