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Last week's trivia answer

    Founded in 1932 to sell nail enamel, I'm a titan in cosmetics, skin care, fragrance and personal care. Full Story

The Motley Fool Take

'Say on Pay' Rejected

    For all the complaining that we do about executive pay, it might come as a surprise that investors recently rejected two out of the three "say on pay" proposals at pharmaceutical companies' annual meetings. Full Story

Fool's School

The Roth IRA

    If you aren't contributing to a Roth IRA already, maybe you should be, as it offers potentially massive tax breaks. There are some important issues to consider first, though. Full Story

My Dumbest Investment

A No-Name Loss

    I'm not even sure of the name of my dumbest investment. It was one of those tech stocks — a search engine, I believe. It's still in my portfolio. Selling it would be admitting I made the mistake to begin with. Full Story

Name That Company

    I'm one of the world's largest hotel companies, with names such as Sheraton, St. Regis, Le Meridien, Aloft, The Luxury Collection, Westin, Four Points and W. Full Story

Last week's trivia answer

    I was born in 1919 in Fort Worth, Texas, and began by selling leather shoe parts. In 1963, I bought an electronics chain whose name I took as my own. In 1977, I introduced the first mass-produced personal computer: the TRS-80® microcomputer. Full Story

Fool's School

Wisdom From Omaha

    Here are some words of wisdom from superinvestors Warren Buffett and Charlie Munger from their recent Berkshire Hathaway annual meeting. They're paraphrased: On trying to time the market: We don't try to pick bottoms. Full Story

My Dumbest Investment

Killed by Fine Print

    The dumbest mistake I ever made was in the late 1960s, when I was 40ish. I deposited money each month into an annuity for my retirement. Later I decided that I could do better elsewhere — but I didn't consult the microscopic fine print. Full Story

Ask the Fool

Evaluating a Company

    Q How should I examine the financials of a company in which I'm thinking of investing? — R.D., Dover, N.H. A There are many numbers to look at and a bunch you can crunch. Full Story

Ask the Fool

Cash Matters

    Q Is it good to see a lot of cash on a company's balance sheet? — N.B., Dalton, Ga. A It depends. Firms with gobs of cash can act quickly when opportunities arise. Full Story

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Name That Company

    Founded in 1932 to sell nail enamel, I'm a titan in cosmetics, skin care, fragrance and personal care. Full Story

Fool's School

The Omaha Perspective

    In early May, more than 30,000 Berkshire Hathaway shareholders descended on Omaha, Neb., to listen to Chairman (and superinvestor) Warren Buffett and his partner, Charlie Munger, answer questions for five hours. Full Story

My Smartest Investment

Stock Takes Flight

    After losing money on investments made on my broker's advice, I started using Value Line. In December 1974, Value Line predicted earnings of $2 in 1975 for an aircraft company. Full Story

The Motley Fool Take

Solid Freeport

    Freeport-McMoRan Copper and Gold (NYSE: FCX), the world's largest publicly traded copper producer, took a 96 percent earnings hit in its March quarter over last year. Nevertheless, improving copper prices are leading to higher share values. Full Story

Last week's trivia answer

    I started out in aircraft in the 1930s. Today I'm a global security giant that rakes in nearly $34 billion yearly, offering aerospace, electronics, information systems, shipbuilding and technical services. Full Story

Ask the Fool

Bulls and Bears, Oh My!

    Q What do the terms "bull" and "bear" mean? — T.R., Escondido, Calif. A You're a bull, or "bullish," on a particular stock or the market if you expect it to go up. A "bear" is pessimistic, expecting a drop in the near future. Full Story

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Name That Company

    I was born in 1919 in Fort Worth, Texas, and began by selling leather shoe parts. In 1963, I bought an electronics chain whose name I took as my own. In 1977, I introduced the first mass-produced personal computer: the TRS-80® microcomputer. Full Story

My Dumbest Investment

A Past of Cattle Futures

    Back in the early 1990s, when I was in my 20s and trying speculative market ventures, a co-worker was receiving calls from a futures broker in Chicago. He said I should try it out. So I sent in $3,000. Full Story

Last week's trivia answer

    The chain that shares my name was started in 1950 in Quincy, Mass., and is today the world's largest coffee and baked goods chain, serving more than 3 million customers each day in nearly 9,000 eateries. Full Story

The Motley Fool Take

McDonald's Rises

    McDonald's (NYSE: MCD) recently delivered appetizing quarterly results, despite the ugly economic environment. First-quarter net income increased 3.5 percent to $979.5 million, while sales dropped 9.5 percent, to $5.08 billion. Full Story

Fool's School

Know When to Sell

    It's important to think things through before buying a stock, but you need to think about when to sell it, too. Otherwise, you might end up holding onto a stinker for far too long. Full Story

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Name That Company y

    I started out in aircraft in the 1930s. Today I'm a global security giant that rakes in nearly $34 billion yearly, offering aerospace, electronics, information systems, shipbuilding and technical services. Full Story

My Dumbest Investment

I.P. Oh No …

    In 2004, a friend told me about a broadband provider that was soon going to go public (via an initial public offering, or IPO) for $1 per share. I bought more than 1,000 shares. The stock tripled, and my friend advised me to sell. Full Story

Ask the Fool

Intrinsic vs. Market Value

    Q What's the difference between intrinsic value and market value? — C.B., Farmington, N.M. A That's a critical concept for investors to understand. Imagine Acme Explosives Co. (ticker: KBOOM). Full Story

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Fool's School

It's All About Price & Quality

    The task of finding good companies to invest in all comes down to two questions: (1) Is this a strong, high-quality company? (2) Is the company's stock priced attractively right now? Full Story

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